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Thompson says America must "unchoose" policies that have led to mass incarceration

Axinn says new data on campus rape will "allow students to see for themselves the full extent of this problem"

Frey says white population is growing in Detroit and other large cities


Susan Murphy to speak at U-M kickoff for data science initiative, Oct 6, Rackham

Andrew Goodman-Bacon, former trainee, wins 2015 Nevins Prize for best dissertation in economic history

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12 at noon, 6050 ISR
Joe Grengs: Policy & planning for transportation equity

Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging

a PSC Research Project

Investigators:   James S. Jackson, Letha Chadiha, Robert J. Taylor, Carmen R. Green, Jacqui Smith, Amy M. Pienta, Toni Antonucci

Our specific aims represent a systematic continuation of our prior RCMAR efforts. Specifically the mission of our Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research (MCUAAAR) is to generate knowledge that will reduce health disparities and improve health. To fulfill this mission, MCUAAAR pursues twin goals of (1) increasing the number of highly trained African American aging researchers, and (2) including more elderly African American subjects in health disparities research. To achieve these two goals, our continuation proposal will explore three specific aims: 1) To recruit and mentor 15 new junior scholars into the area of aging and health research; 2) To increase important research on health and health promotion among Older Adults of ethnic and racial populations, especially African Americans; and 3) To extend research on the recruitment and retention of African American elders in health by utilizing our large Participant Registry. Among other things Aims 1 and 2 are motivated by the NIH-funded study (Ginther et al, 2011), which reported that proposals from black scientists were 10 percentage points less likely to win grants than were applications from white investigators; in practical terms, this gap means that whites are about twice as likely as blacks to win approval. Aim 3 recognizes that a sophisticated social/behavioral approach is required to understand the growing mortality, disease and health disparities among older. Throughout their training, our trainees have unlimited access to our Participant Registry, a research subject pool of currently 1685 minority subjects built over nearly a decade following a Community Based Participatory Model. The significance of this project is directly rooted in three major factors: overcoming critical barriers, improving scientific knowledge, and advancing field of aging research. Our project innovativeness resides in three distinctive features: shifts in current paradigms, novel approaches, and refined concepts.

Funding Period: 09/01/2012 to 06/30/2017

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