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Stephenson says homophobia among gay men raises risk of intimate partner violence

Frey says having more immigrants with higher birth rates fills need in the US

Inglehart's work on the rise of populism cited in NYT

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Highlights

Savolainen wins Outstanding Contribution Award for study of how employment affects recidivism among past criminal offenders

Giving Blueday at ISR focuses on investing in the next generation of social scientists

Pfeffer and Schoeni cover the economic and social dimensions of wealth inequality in this special issue

PRB Policy Communication Training Program for PhD students in demography, reproductive health, population health

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging

a PSC Research Project

Investigators:   James S. Jackson, Letha Chadiha, Robert J. Taylor, Carmen R. Green, Jacqui Smith, Amy M. Pienta, Toni Antonucci

The Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research (MCUAAAR) is a collaborative research and administrative effort based on the campuses of the University of Michigan and Wayne State University. It is one of six centers coordinated by the Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR) to empirically investigate and reduce health disparities between minority and non-minority older adults. To fulfill this mission, MCUAAAR pursues twin goals of (1) increasing the number of highly trained African American aging researchers, and (2) including more elderly African American subjects in health disparities research. In the current project period, we have three aims: 1) To recruit and mentor 15 new junior scholars into the area of aging and health research; 2) To increase important research on health and health promotion among older adults of ethnic and racial populations, especially African Americans; and 3) To extend research on the recruitment and retention of African American elders in health via our large Participant Registry. Aims 1 and 2 are motivated in part by an NIH-funded study (Ginther et al, 2011) finding that proposals from black scientists were 10 percentage points less likely to win grants than were applications from white investigators – which in practical terms means that whites are about twice as likely as blacks to win approval. Aim 3 recognizes that a sophisticated social/behavioral approach is required to understand the growing mortality, disease, and health disparities among older African Americans. The significance of this project is directly rooted in three major factors: overcoming critical barriers to and advancing scientific knowledge in the field of aging research.

Funding Period: 09/01/2012 to 06/30/2017

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