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Edin and Shaefer's book a call to action for Americans to deal with poverty

Weir says pain may underlie rise in suicide and substance-related deaths among white middle-aged Americans

Weitzman says China's one-child policy has had devastating effects on first-born daughters


MCubed opens for new round of seed funding, November 4-18

PSC News, fall 2015 now available

Barbara Anderson appointed chair of Census Scientific Advisory Committee

John Knodel honored by Thailand's Chulalongkorn University

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Dec 7 at noon, 6050 ISR-Thompson
Daniel Eisenberg, "Healthy Minds Network: Mental Health among College-Age Populations"

Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging

a PSC Research Project

Investigators:   James S. Jackson, Letha Chadiha, Robert J. Taylor, Carmen R. Green, Jacqui Smith, Amy M. Pienta, Toni Antonucci

The Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research (MCUAAAR) is a collaborative research and administrative effort based on the campuses of the University of Michigan and Wayne State University. It is one of six centers coordinated by the Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR) to empirically investigate and reduce health disparities between minority and non-minority older adults. To fulfill this mission, MCUAAAR pursues twin goals of (1) increasing the number of highly trained African American aging researchers, and (2) including more elderly African American subjects in health disparities research. In the current project period, we have three aims: 1) To recruit and mentor 15 new junior scholars into the area of aging and health research; 2) To increase important research on health and health promotion among older adults of ethnic and racial populations, especially African Americans; and 3) To extend research on the recruitment and retention of African American elders in health via our large Participant Registry. Aims 1 and 2 are motivated in part by an NIH-funded study (Ginther et al, 2011) finding that proposals from black scientists were 10 percentage points less likely to win grants than were applications from white investigators – which in practical terms means that whites are about twice as likely as blacks to win approval. Aim 3 recognizes that a sophisticated social/behavioral approach is required to understand the growing mortality, disease, and health disparities among older African Americans. The significance of this project is directly rooted in three major factors: overcoming critical barriers to and advancing scientific knowledge in the field of aging research.

Funding Period: 09/01/2012 to 06/30/2017

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