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Work by Bailey and Dynarski cited in NYT piece on income inequality

Pfeffer says housing bubble masked decade-long growth in household net worth inequality

House, Burgard, Schoeni et al find that unemployment and recession have contrasting effects on mortality risk

Highlights

Jeff Morenoff makes Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers list for 2014

Susan Murphy named Distinguished University Professor

Sarah Burgard and former PSC trainee Jennifer Ailshire win ASA award for paper

James Jackson to be appointed to NSF's National Science Board

Next Brown Bag


PSC Brown Bags will return in the fall

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Economic Status, Health, & Wellbeing over the Life Course and Across Generations

a PSC Research Project

Investigators:   Vicki Freedman, Mick P. Couper, Katherine A. McGonagle, Robert F. Schoeni, Frank P. Stafford

Spanning over four decades, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is the world's longest running household panel survey. The archive presents unique research opportunities for breakthroughs in understanding the connections among economic status, health, and wellbeing across generations and over the life course. This Program Project renewal will generate significant multi-disciplinary contributions to this area of research through four projects and two cores. The Program Project has three overarching aims: First, we will collect new data in four topic areas, each designed to enhance information in the PSID about family context and wellbeing at critical junctures in the life course. New data collections include: 1) a new listing (including basic demographic descriptors) of all children and parents of PSID respondents and their spouses/partners in core 2013 PSID. Recognizing the increasing complexity of families in America, the family roster will include biologic, adopted, and step relationships; 2) a new module on family transfers to be collected in the core 2013 PSID interview that links to the family roster; 3) a new mixed mode (web/mail) module to capture retrospective childhood circumstances to be collected in 2014; and 4) a new supplement on disability, time use and wellbeing to be collected from PSID respondents aged 60 and older and their spouses/partners, which will support investigations into factors that buffer the negative effects of disability on wellbeing. Second, we will promote broader use of the PSID for aging-related science through a small grants program, several thematic conferences, the development of a set of online on-demand tutorials (or webinars), the enhancement of extract tools, and exhibitions at national conferences. Third, projects will investigate pathways between childhood circumstances and adult health and socioeconomic outcomes; examine the family transfers within a life course and intergenerational context; and provide a rich, national portrait of disability, time use and well-being among older adults, identifying factors over the life course that buffer the negative consequences of disability on subjective wellbeing and exploring conditions under which "giving" time conveys positive wellbeing.

Funding Period: 12/01/2012 to 11/30/2017

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