Home > Research . Search . Country . Browse . Small Grants

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Krause says having religious friends leads to gratitude, which is associated with better health

Work by Bailey and Dynarski on growing income gap in graduation rates cited in NYT

Johnston says marijuana use by college students highest in 30 years

Highlights

Martha Bailey and Nicolas Duquette win Cole Prize for article on War on Poverty

Michigan's graduate sociology program tied for 4th with Stanford in USN&WR rankings

Jeff Morenoff makes Reuters' Highly Cited Researchers list for 2014

Susan Murphy named Distinguished University Professor

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Sep 22
Paula Fomby (Michigan), Family Complexity, Siblings, and Children's Aggressive Behavior at School Entry

A Web-Based Survey of Daily Experienced Well-Being in Older Couples

a PSC Research Project

Investigators:   Jacqui Smith, Richard D. Gonzalez, Mary Beth Ofstedal, Lindsay H. Ryan

As policy makers search for indices to complement existing population-based economic markers there is new interest in survey measures of well-being, such as the Day Reconstruction Method (DRM), that capture how people think and feel about their life circumstances along with details on daily activities. The DRM provides data on experience that is distinct from global reports of well-being. Several research teams, including ours have independently developed and tested short CATI/CAPI survey measures of experienced well-being suitable for large representative surveys of older adults such as the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). The 2012-2016 HRS renewal, however, posed new challenges to adapt this measure for the web mode and to consider the implications of data dependencies within couples. HRS interviews both partners in older households. To date, studies of experienced well-being have only interviewed individuals.

The goals of this project are threefold. They address important methodological and conceptual issues about mode and couple effects in the measurement of global and experienced well-being. First, we utilize available HRS data collected between 2008 and 2011 to examine the comparability of responses about global well-being obtained from both partners in older couples across three modes (telephone, in-person, web). This constellation of HRS data provides a unique opportunity for comparative between-group and within-person (couple) mode analyses in subsamples representative of the population over age 50. Second, we conduct a randomized experiment with a locally recruited sample of older couples to explore mode and couple effects in experienced well-being. This study will use the new short measure of experienced well-being to be included in future waves of HRS. Because age, gender, race, education, health, and cognitive decline after age 50 could interact with mode and type of well-being measure, we will examine these factors in our analyses of the secondary data and the experiment. Third, in a pilot 7-day diary study, we explore differential partner and couple participation across days, the effects of repeated measurement, and also obtain preliminary data about the day-to-day dynamics of partner influences on experienced well-being.

A web-based measure of experienced well-being could be a valuable resource for intermittent modules in large longitudinal panels to study the adaptation processes that occur in older couples following loss of employment, retirement from paid work, health challenges or adaptation to disability. Our exploratory study will provide preliminary information about the feasibility of such future endeavors. The information obtained will advance assessment of well-being in large surveys of older adults and our understanding of life quality in late life.

Funding Period: 09/30/2012 to 08/31/2014

Search . Browse