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Lam says tightening global labor market good for American workers

Johnston says e-cigs may reverse two-decades of progress on smoking reduction

Mueller-Smith finds incarceration increases the likelihood of committing more, and more serious, crimes

Highlights

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

David Lam is new director of Institute for Social Research

Elizabeth Bruch wins Robert Merton Prize for paper in analytic sociology

Elizabeth Bruch wins ASA award for paper in mathematical sociology

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags will be back fall 2015


Neal Krause photo

Landmark Spirituality and Health Survey

a PSC Research Project

Investigator:   Neal Krause

Some studies suggest that people who are greatly involved in religion tend to enjoy better physical and mental health than individuals who are less involved. But at least three problems with these findings must be overcome. First, researchers have proposed many ways in which religion may affect health, making it hard to determine how the beneficial effects might arise. Second, a number of studies on religion and health have been conducted with college students, making it hard to know if the findings apply to a more representative group. Third, if religion affects health, then researchers must identify the specific physiological mechanisms that are at work. This project approaches the study of religion and health with a comprehensive battery of religion measures, a large nationally representative sample of adults, and a range of biomarkers that can show how religion may affect physiological changes in the body.

Funding Period: 06/01/2013 to 05/31/2016

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