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Almirall says comparing SMART designs will increase treatment quality for children with autism

Thompson says America must "unchoose" policies that have led to mass incarceration

Alter says lack of access to administrative data is "big drag on research"


Knodel honored by Thailand's Chulalongkorn University

Susan Murphy to speak at U-M kickoff for data science initiative, Oct 6, Rackham

Andrew Goodman-Bacon, former trainee, wins 2015 Nevins Prize for best dissertation in economic history

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12 at noon, 6050 ISR
Joe Grengs: Policy & planning for transportation equity

Colter Mitchell photo

Population Neuroscience: A Pilot Project to Examine Poverty and Brain Imaging in Adolescence

a PSC Small Fund Research Project

Investigators:   Colter Mitchell, Christopher Monk

Large studies of racially diverse, representative samples have established the negative effects of neighborhood and family poverty and social inequality on later outcomes. Recent work provides important clues about how these impoverished environments become biologically embedded during childhood and increase the risk of poor mental health. Findings indicate that children in poverty are more likely to experience stressors, including dangerous homes and neighborhoods, family instability, conflict, and neglect, that have a negative impact on the brain. Our pilot project will provide preliminary data to support an R01 grant application to NIH to study how adverse environments sculpt brain, physiological and cognitive-affective development and give rise to mental health disorders in a representative study of adolescents. This pilot project has three interrelated aims: 1) Confirm the feasibility of the measures and protocols intended for the larger R01 sample. 2) Examine the relationship between poverty and brain structure. 3) Examine the relationship between poverty and brain function.

Funding Period: 01/01/2014 to 12/31/2014

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