Race, Ethnicity, and Inequality in Charleston, South Carolina 1860-1880

A PSC Brown Bag Seminar

Jeff Strickland (University of Michigan, Population Studies Center)

Monday, 03-17-2008.   ARCHIVED EVENT

Location: 6050 ISR Thompson St

This presentation will link inequality and segregation to mortality in Charleston, South Carolina during the transition from slavery to freedom (1860 to 1880). Charleston had a racially and ethnically diverse population: native-born whites (southerners and northerners), European immigrants (primarily German and Irish), and African Americans (both Free People of Color and slaves in 1860). Compared to most nineteenth-century US cities, a defining characteristic of Charleston was spatial integration and interaction among these racial and ethnic groups. The presentation will use historical GIS to describe segregation patterns, and it will discuss the social demography of the city with a special emphasis on mortality.

PSC Brown Bag seminars highlight recent research in population studies and serve as a focal point for building our research community.

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