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Work by Geronimus cited in account of Serena Williams' maternal health complications

Alexander and Massey compare outcomes for children whose parents did and did not take part in Great Migration

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Can We Explain Black-White Disparities in Infant Mortality?

A PSC Brown Bag Seminar

Steven J. Haider (Michigan State University, Department of Economics)

Monday, 04/13/2009.   ARCHIVED EVENT

Location: 6050 ISR Thompson St

The U.S. infant mortality rate (IMR) improved substantially between 1985 and 2001, falling 35 percent from 10.4 to 6.8 per 1,000 live births. Despite these improvements, large racial disparities persist: in 2001, the IMR was 13.2 for blacks compared with 5.6 for whites. Although it is natural to suspect that the black-white IMR gap arises from socioeconomic differences, such an explanation seems at odds with the fact that the IMR for another socioeconomically disadvantaged group, U.S. Hispanics, was 5.4 in 2001, lower than that of whites. In this paper, we systematically examine the differences in IMRs between blacks and whites, assessing when these differences arise and their potential explanations. Specifically, we consider differences in the birthweight distribution, mortality over the first 28 days, mortality over the remaining part of the first year, the correlates of each of these underlying IMR components, and infant death reporting. The main contributions of this paper are three-fold: we provide a transparent and systematic treatment of the underlying components of infant mortality and their correlates, we pay specific attention to how these components fit together, and we present similar results for other racial/ethnic groups to place the black-white gaps in perspective.

PSC Brown Bag seminars highlight recent research in population studies and serve as a focal point for building our research community.

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