U-M Carceral State Project Symposium

Containment and the Carceral State

a Symposium

Heather Ann Thompson
Asia Johnson
Gift Chowchevech
Pete Letkemann
Tania Morris Diaz
Cozine Welch

Wednesday, 1/16/2019, 5:30pm.   ARCHIVED EVENT

Location: Hatcher Library Gallery

Please join the University of Michigan Carceral State Project for the third event in its 2018-19 symposium, a year of critical dialogue about criminal justice, policing, imprisonment, inequality, and what we can do about it. This roundtable will feature five organizers, lawyers, community members, and activists who will discuss the many forms of containment that comprise the carceral state--including juvenile detention, immigration detainment, jails, and men and women's prisons. They will reflect on the diverse institutions of containment, incarceration, and detention in the United States, their development over time, and their relationships to one another and to the carceral state more broadly.

Roundtable panelists:
-Asia Johnson, Bail Disruptor, The Bail Project and Detroit Justice Center
-Gift Chowchevech, Therapist, Healing & Wellness Arts
-Pete Letkemann, Chair, Family Advisory Board to MDOC
-Tania Morris Diaz, Staff Attorney, Michigan Immigrant Rights Center
-Cozine Welch, Managing Editor, The Michigan Review of Prisoner Creative Writing
-Heather Ann Thompson (chair), U-M DAAS, History, and RC

Registration is free and open to the public. Please mark your calendars for upcoming events on February 13th, March 13th, and April 10th!

The U-M Carceral State project is an interdisciplinary collaboration that brings together faculty, students, staff, and community members to examine, research, and advocate on issues related to mass incarceration, policing, immigration detention, and criminal justice.

Related Material:

RSVP
Carceral State Project

BIO:

Dr. Heather Ann Thompson has conducted research and written on the history of policing and mass incarceration, and the current criminal justice system. Her recent award-winning book, Blood in the Water, focuses on the history and legacy of the Attica Prison Rebellion in 1971.

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