Unravel Injustice: Taking Action. Part 2: Social Science in the Public Interest, Action for the Public Good

The promise and peril of evidence-based activism

a Symposium

William Darity (Duke University, School of Public Policy,)

Friday, 2/15/2019, 1:00pm to 3:00pm.   ARCHIVED EVENT

Location: ISR Thompson Rm 1430

A two-part discussion on our roles as citizens and scholars in movements to create a more just and humanistic society.

2019 University of Michigan MLK Symposium


Keynote: The promise and peril of evidence-based activism
By: William Darity
Professor, School of Public Policy, Duke University

Round table discussions with noted scholar activists to follow keynote:
-Kristie Dotson, Associate Professor, Dept of Philosophy, Michigan State University, @DrBlkFeminist
-Alexes Harris, Professor, Dept of Sociology, University of Washington, @AlexesHarris ‏
-Mary Romero, Professor, Dept of Sociology, Arizona State University
-Kyle Whyte, Associate Professor, Dept of Philosophy, Michigan State University, @kylepowyswhyte
-Camille Wilson, Professor, School of Education, University of Michigan

Related Material:

Michigan Calendar

BIO:

William A. (“Sandy”) Darity Jr. is the Samuel DuBois Cook Professor of Public Policy, African and African American Studies, and Economics and the director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. He has served as chair of the Department of African and African American Studies and was the founding director of the Research Network on Racial and Ethnic Inequality at Duke. Previously he served as director of the Institute of African American Research, director of the Moore Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program, director of the Undergraduate Honors Program in economics, and director of Graduate Studies at the University of North Carolina.

Darity’s research focuses on inequality by race, class and ethnicity, stratification economics, schooling and the racial achievement gap, North-South theories of trade and development, skin shade and labor market outcomes, the economics of reparations, the Atlantic slave trade and the Industrial Revolution, the history of economics, and the social psychological effects of exposure to unemployment.

He was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (2011-2012) at Stanford, a fellow at the National Humanities Center (1989-90) and a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors (1984). He received the Samuel Z. Westerfield Award in 2012 from the National Economic Association, the organization's highest honor. He is a past president of the National Economic Association and the Southern Economic Association. He also has taught at Grinnell College, the University of Maryland at College Park, the University of Texas at Austin, Simmons College and Claremont-McKenna College.

He has served as Editor in Chief of the latest edition of the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, (Macmillan Reference, 2008) and as an Associate Editor of the new edition of the Encyclopedia of Race and Racism (2013).

His most recent books are Economics, Economists, and Expectations: Microfoundations to Macroapplications (2004) (co-authored with Warren Young and Robert Leeson) and a volume co-edited with Ashwini Deshpande titled Boundaries of Clan and Color: Transnational Comparisons of Inter-Group Disparity (2003) both published by Routledge. He has published or edited 12 books and published more than 210 articles in professional journals.

Forthcoming . Past . Next

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Hicken explores association of gun violence, segregation and public health

Shaefer named special counselor for MDHHS

Research shows boredom is on the rise for adolescents, especially girls

More News

Highlights

Sarah Burgard appointed as next PSC director

National Study of Caregiving (NSOC) Extended

More Highlights


Connect with PSC follow PSC on Twitter Like PSC on Facebook