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Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

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U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Reynolds Farley

Farley looks at why so many Michigan metro areas have fallen into emergency-manager status

a PSC In The News reference, 2014

"Emergency managers in black-majority cities reflect growing income gap" - The Bridge. 01/22/2014.

In this op ed, Reynolds Farley discusses the historical slide into disadvantage that has caused some majority-black Michigan municipalities to lose local governance. He says that places like Benton Harbor, Detroit, Flint, Highland Park, Inkster, Pontiac, Buena Vista, and Muskegon Heights, which all have had emergency managers appointed, have signed consent agreements, and/or have lost local control of their school systems in recent years, are hampered by the declining incomes of blacks. Looking at the years since the Civil Rights Movement, Farley says: "The troubling fact is that the economic status of the average African-American resident of Michigan is much less favorable now than it was in 1970."

Researcher:

Reynolds Farley

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