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Buchmueller says employee wages are hit harder than corporate profits by rising health insurance costs

Davis-Kean et al. link children's self-perceptions to their math and reading achievement

Yang and Mahajan examine how hurricanes impact migration to the US

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Highlights

Pamela Smock elected to PAA Committee on Publications

Viewing the eclipse from ISR-Thompson

Paula Fomby to succeed Jennifer Barber as Associate Director of PSC

PSC community celebrates Violet Elder's retirement from PSC

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Sept 11, 2017, noon:
Welcoming of Postdoctoral Fellows: Angela Bruns, Karra Greenberg, Sarah Seelye and Emily Treleaven

Reynolds Farley

Farley looks at why so many Michigan metro areas have fallen into emergency-manager status

a PSC In The News reference, 2014

"Emergency managers in black-majority cities reflect growing income gap" - The Bridge. 01/22/2014.

In this op ed, Reynolds Farley discusses the historical slide into disadvantage that has caused some majority-black Michigan municipalities to lose local governance. He says that places like Benton Harbor, Detroit, Flint, Highland Park, Inkster, Pontiac, Buena Vista, and Muskegon Heights, which all have had emergency managers appointed, have signed consent agreements, and/or have lost local control of their school systems in recent years, are hampered by the declining incomes of blacks. Looking at the years since the Civil Rights Movement, Farley says: "The troubling fact is that the economic status of the average African-American resident of Michigan is much less favorable now than it was in 1970."

Researcher:

Reynolds Farley

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