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Findings by Burgard, Kalousova, and Seefeldt on the mental health impact of job insecurity

ISR ranks 4th in UM's record-setting unit expenditures for research

Frey on why Michigan needs more newcomers

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On Giving Blue Day, help support the next generation through the PSC Alumni Grad Student Support Fund or ISR's Next Gen Fund

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Pregnant woman in political t-shirt

Health inequality and American politics

1/6/2014 feature story

Arline Geronimus, John Bound, and Javier Rodriguez investigate trends in infant, neonatal, and post-neonatal mortality rates under Republican and Democratic administrations.

More Information.

John Bound
Arline T. Geronimus
Javier Rodriguez

Project Information:

The Political Origins of Health Inequality: Political Parties and Infant Mortality

The proposed research project focuses on developing an understanding of the mechanisms by which political actors and institutions affect inequalities in health. Results from our own research show that, relative to trend, national and race-specific infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates decrease under Democratic administrations and increase under Republican administrations (1965-2010). The purpose of the proposed research is to further investigate these trends. We plan to assemble a comprehensive set of state and county level data on overall and race specific infant-related mortality rates, macro-social determinants of health, and the party composition of state and local governments in place during the post ?political realignment? period (1960-2012). Such detailed data would permit us to identify enough exogenous, natural variation across levels of analysis and time for causal inference. Our methodological approach is a combination of time series, hierarchical modeling approaches applied to natural experiment scenarios. The proposed project will outline the foundations of an important yet overlooked research agenda: The connections between large historical health inequalities on the basis of race and socioeconomic standing and politics specific variables.

Arline T. Geronimus, John Bound, Javier Rodriguez

Feature Archive.