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Xu et al find lower cognition at midlife for adults born during China's 1959-61 famine

UM's Wolfers on separating deep expertise from partisanship in analyses of economic condtions

Findings by Burgard, Kalousova, and Seefeldt on the mental health impact of job insecurity

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Apply by Jan 8 for NIA-supported PSC post-doc fellowship, to begin Sept 1, 2018

On Giving Blue Day, help support the next generation through the PSC Alumni Grad Student Support Fund or ISR's Next Gen Fund

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

African American woman has BP taken

Race-related stress and hypertension prevalence

2/19/2014 feature story

Jeffrey Morenoff, James House, and colleagues find that racism-related vigilance--a form of chronic psychosocial stress connected to discrimination--is associated with increased odds of hypertension among blacks.

More Information.

James S. House
Jeffrey Morenoff

Publication Information:

Hicken, Margaret, Hedy Lee, Jeffrey Morenoff, James S. House, and David R. Williams. 2014. "Racial/ethnic Disparities in Hypertension Prevalence: Reconsidering the Role of Chronic Stress." American Journal of Public Health, 104(1): 117-123. PMCID: PMC3910029.

Using data from the Chicago Community Adult Health Study, we investigated the association between anticipatory stress, also known as racism-related vigilance, and hypertension prevalence in Black, Hispanic, and White adults. We regressed hypertension prevalence on the interaction between race/ethnicity and vigilance in logit models and found that Blacks reported the highest vigilance levels. For Blacks, each unit increase in vigilance was associated with a 4% increase in the odds of hypertension. Hispanics showed a similar but nonsignificant association, and Whites showed no association. We conclude that vigilance may represent a significant source of chronic stress that contributes to the higher prevalence of hypertension among Blacks than Whites, and possibly to hypertension among Hispanics.

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