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Work by Geronimus cited in account of Serena Williams' maternal health complications

Alexander and Massey compare outcomes for children whose parents did and did not take part in Great Migration

Geronimus on pushing past early dismissal of her weathering hypothesis

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AA named 2018 Best Place to Live in America (out of 100 cities)

Remembering Jim Morgan, founding member of ISR and creator of the PSID

1/17/18: ISR screening and discussion of documentary "Class Divide" at Michigan Theater

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Science and technology float, Tiananmen Square, Beijing

China's rise in science and technology

7/16/2014 feature story

Yu Xie, Chunni Zhang, and Qing Lai examine trends in China's recent contributions to science and technology, including through labor, R&D expenditures, degree production, and research output.

More Information.

Yu Xie
Qing Lai
Chunni Zhang

Publication Information:

Xie, Yu, Chunni Zhang, and Qing Lai. 2014. "China’s rise as a major contributor to science and technology." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(26): 9437-9442. PMCID: PMC4084436.

In the past three decades, China has become a major contributor to science and technology. China now employs an increasingly large labor force of scientists and engineers at relatively high earnings and produces more science and engineering degrees than the United States at all levels, particularly bachelor's. China's research and development expenditure has been rising. Research output in China has been sharply increasing since 2002, making China the second largest producer of scientific papers after the United States. The quality of research by Chinese scientists has also been improving steadily. However, China's rise in science also faces serious difficulties, partly attributable to its rigid, top–down administrative system, with allegations of scientific misconduct trending upward.

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