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Work by Geronimus cited in account of Serena Williams' maternal health complications

Alexander and Massey compare outcomes for children whose parents did and did not take part in Great Migration

Geronimus on pushing past early dismissal of her weathering hypothesis

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation health leadership development programs accepting applications

AA named 2018 Best Place to Live in America (out of 100 cities)

Remembering Jim Morgan, founding member of ISR and creator of the PSID

1/17/18: ISR screening and discussion of documentary "Class Divide" at Michigan Theater

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

group at sunset, hands raised

Spirituality and health

9/11/2014 feature story

Using a nationally representative survey sample, Neal Krause analyzes measures of religiosity in relation to a range of biomarkers to assess the association of religious devotion and health.

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Neal Krause

Project Information:

Landmark Spirituality and Health Survey

Some studies suggest that people who are greatly involved in religion tend to enjoy better physical and mental health than individuals who are less involved. But at least three problems with these findings must be overcome. First, researchers have proposed many ways in which religion may affect health, making it hard to determine how the beneficial effects might arise. Second, a number of studies on religion and health have been conducted with college students, making it hard to know if the findings apply to a more representative group. Third, if religion affects health, then researchers must identify the specific physiological mechanisms that are at work. This project approaches the study of religion and health with a comprehensive battery of religion measures, a large nationally representative sample of adults, and a range of biomarkers that can show how religion may affect physiological changes in the body.

Neal Krause

Feature Archive.