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Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

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Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

College roommates drinking

College roommate impact on binge drinking

11/24/2014 feature story

Daniel Eisenberg and colleagues use a natural experiment inherent in assigned college roommates to estimate peer effects for several health risk behaviors.

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Daniel Eisenberg

Publication Information:

Eisenberg, Daniel, Ezra Golberstein, and Janis L. Whitlock. 2014. "Peer effects on risky behaviors: New evidence from college roommate assignments." Journal of Health Economics, 33: 126-138.

Social scientists continue to devote considerable attention to spillover effects for risky behaviors because of the important policy implications and the persistent challenges in identifying unbiased causal effects. We use the natural experiment of assigned college roommates to estimate peer effects for several measures of health risks: binge drinking, smoking, illicit drug use, gambling, having multiple sex partners, suicidal ideation, and non-suicidal self-injury. We find significant peer effects for binge drinking but little evidence of effects for other outcomes, although there is tentative evidence that peer effects for smoking may be positive among men and negative among women. In contrast to prior research, the peer effects for binge drinking are significant for all subgroups defined by sex and prior drinking status. We also find that pre-existing risky behaviors predict the closeness of friendships, which underscores the significance of addressing selection biases in studies of peer effects.

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