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Buchmueller says employee wages are hit harder than corporate profits by rising health insurance costs

Davis-Kean et al. link children's self-perceptions to their math and reading achievement

Yang and Mahajan examine how hurricanes impact migration to the US

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Pamela Smock elected to PAA Committee on Publications

Viewing the eclipse from ISR-Thompson

Paula Fomby to succeed Jennifer Barber as Associate Director of PSC

PSC community celebrates Violet Elder's retirement from PSC

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Sept 11, 2017, noon:
Welcoming of Postdoctoral Fellows: Angela Bruns, Karra Greenberg, Sarah Seelye and Emily Treleaven

Young couple argues

Dynamic patterns and factors in intimate partner violence

5/11/2015 feature story

Yasamin Kusunoki examines violence in young women's relationships and the factors that accompany this violence over their relationship histories.

More Information.

Yasamin Kusunoki

Project Information:

The Dynamics of Intimate Partner Violence

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health problem among adolescents and young adults in the U.S., where about one-third of young people have experienced such violence. Consequences of IPV for women include higher rates of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, greater chance of dying in childbirth, and greater likelihood that children will have low birth weight and will die in infancy. Some research suggests that these health consequences are greater as the frequency and severity of violence increase. Methodological and substantive problems with past research substantially limit our understanding of IPV and how to reduce or prevent it. In particular, we know little about how IPV changes over time, and what individual and relationship factors influence these changes. This project investigates the dynamic patterns of violence within young women's intimate relationships and the extent to which individual and relationship factors affect these dynamic patterns. Newly available data from the Relationship Dynamics and Social Life (RDSL) study make this research possible because they include detailed weekly measures of IPV and pregnancy for a racially and socioeconomically diverse, population-representative random sample of young women. The RDSL has data from baseline face-to-face interviews and 2.5 years of weekly follow-up journal-type surveys on respondents' relationship experiences (including violence), sex, contraception, and pregnancy.

Yasamin Kusunoki

Feature Archive.