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Davis-Kean et al. link children's self-perceptions to their math and reading achievement

Yang and Mahajan examine how hurricanes impact migration to the US

Patrick and colleagues analyze high-intensity drinking among adolescents

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Pamela Smock elected to PAA Committee on Publications

Viewing the eclipse from ISR-Thompson

Paula Fomby to succeed Jennifer Barber as Associate Director of PSC

PSC community celebrates Violet Elder's retirement from PSC

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Sept 11, 2017, noon:
Welcoming of Postdoctoral Fellows: Angela Bruns, Karra Greenberg, Sarah Seelye and Emily Treleaven

Man has health screening

Impact of subsidies for preventive health screenings in Detroit

7/20/2015 feature story

Dean Yang examines how information and subsidies work together to encourage low- and medium-income Detroiters to engage in preventive health care.

More Information.

Dean Yang

Project Information:

Promoting preventive health care in Michigan: The impact of information and incentives

Use of preventive care in Michigan is fundamental to ensuring health for residents and to minimizing healthcare costs for consumers, insurers, and the government. This randomized field experiment in the metro-Detroit area is intended to answer three research questions: (1) What are the barriers to accessing preventive health care in Michigan, and how do they vary with demographic characteristics? (2) What are the impacts of information and incentives on individuals' take-up of preventive health care, and can inducing an endowment effect be a low-cost way to increase usage of preventive health care? (3) What are the short- and medium-run impacts of incentivizing preventive health screenings on individuals' health care usage? Our sample consists of adults living in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods in the metro Detroit area. We measure the effectiveness of (1) providing information about where to obtain low-cost health screenings and (2) offering $10 and $50 subsidies to encourage people to obtain health screenings at a nearby health clinic. Among those offered a subsidy to obtain a health screening, some receive a coupon card for the subsidy offer, while others receive an inactive gift card. While both cards will help individuals remember to use the subsidy, the gift card endows the participant with the subsidy. Failing to activate a gift card may be seen as a loss, which is theorized to be more painful than missing out on an equivalent gain. In this case, we aim to measure the cost effectiveness of endowment effects to promote the use of subsidies. Nine months after the initial study, a follow-up survey will measure the medium-run impacts on healthcare usage. The results of this project will provide insights into the nature and magnitude of barriers to preventive care and inform ways to increase health screenings among a diverse population of Michigan residents.

Dean Yang, Yusuf Can Masatlioglu

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