Home > Events & News > Brown Bag Schedule . Archive

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

More News

Highlights

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Graph of uninsured Americans, 2008-2014

Post-ACA changes in health insurance coverage for blacks, whites, Hispanics

10/20/2016 feature story

Thomas Buchmueller, Helen Levy, and colleagues find reduced racial/ethnic disparities in health insurance coverage following implementation of the Affordable Care Act, particularly in states that expanded Medicaid programs.

More Information.

Helen Levy
Thomas C. Buchmueller

Publication Information:

Buchmueller, Thomas C., Z. Levinson, Helen Levy, and B. Wolfe. 2016. "Effect of the Affordable Care Act on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Insurance Coverage." American Journal of Public Health, 106(8): 1416-1421. PMCID: PMC4940635.

We used data from the American Community Survey (2008-2014) to document how health insurance coverage changed for white, black, and Hispanic non-elderly adults after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) went into effect. We examined changes in the percentage of each group who were uninsured, covered by Medicaid, or covered by private health insurance, stratifying by income and state Medicaid expansion status. We found that in 2013, 40.5% of Hispanics and 25.8% of blacks were uninsured, compared with 14.8% of whites. We found a larger gap in private insurance, which was partially offset by higher rates of public coverage among blacks and Hispanics. After the main ACA provisions went into effect in 2014, coverage disparities declined slightly as the percentage of adults who were uninsured decreased by 7.1 percentage points for Hispanics, 5.1 percentage points for blacks, and 3 percentage points for whites. Coverage gains were greater in states that expanded Medicaid programs. Although the ACA has reduced racial/ethnic disparities in coverage, substantial disparities remain. We posit that further reductions will require Medicaid expansion by more states and improved program take-up in states that have already done so.

Feature Archive.