Home > Events & News > Brown Bag Schedule . Archive

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

More News

Highlights

Bailey et al. find higher incomes among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

psc brown bag iconMoving Women: Household Composition, Labor Demand and Crop Choice

Isaac Mbiti (Department of Economics, Southern Methodist University)

03/10/2008, at noon in room 6050 ISR-Thompson.

Analysis of the Indian census shows that female marital migration accounts for the majority of the spatial mobility in India. Using a unique panel dataset that is representative of rural India, I estimate the effect of increases in the value of female labor on women’s marriage market outcomes. Female labor is more valuable in rice farming than wheat farming. I exploit rainfall shocks across rice farming households’ and wheat farming households’ to identify the effect of female labor productivity on the marriage market. Consistent with a model of household composition and crop choice in the presence of imperfect markets for female labor, I find that increases in female labor productivity are associated with decreases in the marriage rate of prime age females. Moreover, when female labor productivity is high, dowries paid out by the bride’s family households also decline indicating a rise in the bargaining power of the bride’s family during dowry negotiations. Female disadvantage in India has been tied to the culture of dowry. These results suggest that policies designed to increase the value of female labor can improve women’s standing in the household by reducing dowry payments.


  View All