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psc brown bag iconHuman Decision Processes, Population Structure, and Online Dating Markets

Elizabeth Eve Bruch (PSC, U of M)

04/10/2017, 12:00:00, 6050 ISR - Thompson

I will discuss findings from several ongoing projects that use models in fields ranging from marketing to cognitive science to physics to explore: (1) how people evaluate and choose among potential mates on online dating sites; and (2) what the implications of those choices are for vertical and horizontal stratification in dating markets. I argue that big data have been underutilized as a source of detailed information on human behavior, and how these behaviors aggregate into larger scale social structures. In addition to its scientific merits, my talk will provide practical knowledge of men and women's major "deal-breakers," and whether and/or how leagues (i.e., "you're out of my league") operate in U.S. romantic markets. Finally, I will present some early results from my book project that tries to understand why dating experiences differ markedly across cities that vary in their size and sex ratio.

Presenter:
Dr. Bruch's work combines statistical models of individuals' choice behaviors with formal modeling approaches that capture the implications of those behaviors for aggregate social patterns. She has developed "cognitively plausible" statistical models of neighborhood and mate choice, and is applying models from behavioral ecology to understand how individuals adapt their mate seeking strategies to particular romantic markets.


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