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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

psc brown bag iconChildhood neighborhood disadvantage and adult social and economic well-being: Evidence from sibling and cousin fixed effects using the NLSY

Steven Alvarado (Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Cornell University)

11/13/2017, 12:00:00, 6050 ISR - Thompson

Recent neighborhood effects studies have largely focused on proximate associations between childhood ecological conditions and childhood outcomes. In contrast, I capitalize on restricted data from the NLSY 1979 and NLSY Child and Young Adults cohorts to study how childhood neighborhood disadvantage impacts joblessness, income, obesity, and criminal justice contact in adulthood. Sibling fixed effects and cousin fixed effects models, which address unobserved confounding at the parental and grand-parental levels, suggest that exposure to childhood neighborhood disadvantage indeed impacts adult well-being. Moreover, I analyze whether these neighborhood effects operate through sensitive childhood years, teen socialization, duration effects, and cumulative effects across respondents' life-course. Lastly, familial exposure to multiple generations of neighborhood disadvantage yield pernicious effects on well-being for grandchildren.

If you require an accommodation to participate in this event, please contact Anna Massey at abeattie@umich.edu at least one week in advance of this event.

Presenter:
Steven received his BA in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley and his PhD in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Cornell University. His research focuses on questions regarding inequality on various levels including race and ethnicity, education, neighborhoods, health, immigration, and criminal justice contact in the U.S. He relies mostly restricted nationally representative longitudinal data and quantitative methods. My work has been published in Social Forces, Social Science Research, Race and Social Problems, and the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. In addition, he has been a fellow of the National Science Foundation and the Institute for Education Sciences of the U.S. Department of Education.


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