Monthly Archive for September, 2017

Opoid Use and Labor Force Participation

US Map Opoids and LFP

Image link: Large | Small

Alan Krueger has a paper in Brookings Papers on Economic Activity on opoid use and labor force participation and it got quite a bit of press coverage as well. And, luckily for us, the data are also available:

Where have all the workers gone? An inquiry into the decline of the U.S. labor force participation rate
Alan Kruger | Brooking Papers on Economic Activity
Fall 2017
This paper is part of the Fall 2017 edition of the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, the leading conference series and journal in economics for timely, cutting-edge research about real-world policy issues.

Paper | Data | Slides [Krueger] | Slides [Katz, discussant] | Slides [Notowidigdo, discussant]

Additional Coverage
How the opioid epidemic has affected the U.S. labor force, county-by-county
Fred Dews | Brookings Now
September 7, 2017

The Opioid Crisis Is Taking a Toll on the American Labor Force
Eric Levitz | New York Magazine
Sep 7, 2017

The stunning prevalence of painkiller use among unemployed men
Danielle Paquette | WonkBlog: Washington Post
Sep 7, 2017

Drugs Are Why 1 in 5 Men Drop Out of the Labor Market
Sy Mukherjee | Fortune
Sep 7, 2017

One in Five Men Leave Workforce due to Opioid Epidemic, so Drugs – not Immigrants – are Stealing Jobs
John Haltiwanger | Newsweek
Sep 7, 2017

The Future of Free Public Access to Government Information

This tweet and post alerted us to the potential loss of free public access to government information, due to a potential modification of Title 44.

DLF tweet

This PSC blog entry will provide links to all the posts on the potential changes to Title 44 on the freegovinfo.info website, a really valuable site founded by the two Jims (James A. Jacobs and James R. Jacobs). But, first some bonus links:

Link | Audio of James A. Jacobs summarizing the issue
Link | The Digital Library blog post, which gives a nice summary of the audio
Link | Call to sign a petition to protect the public right to government information

Here we go again: GPO wants to change Title 44
James A. Jacobs and James R. Jacobs | freegovinfo.info
July 15, 2017
This piece is heavily referenced, providing a history of previous attempts at re-writing Title 44. It includes the gem of a “Let Me Google That For You Act” introduced by Tom Coburn, R-OK that would repeal the National Technical Information Act of 1988.

Reading between the tea leaves: more about revising Title 44
James A. Jacobs and James R. Jacobs | freegovinfo.info
July 31, 2017
Clarificaiton of GPO’s intentions with revising Title 44. First, not just Chapter 19, but “a thoughtful evaluation of all chapters.” This post is also nicely annotated.

This is not a drill. The future of Title 44 and the depository library program hang in the balance
James A. Jacobs and James R. Jacobs | freegovinfo.info
July 27, 2017
This post provides suggested talking points/letter content for public input. Alas, the deadline of August 31 has passed, but there is still a petition you can sign

Mid-August came 5-posts:

Strengthening the Discussions about Title 44
Strengthening the Discussions, Part 1: Modernize the definition of “publications”
Strengthening the Discussions, Part 2: Ensure Free Access
Strengthening the Discussions, Part 3: Ensure Privacy
Strengthening the Discussions, Part 4: Ensure Preservation

The Promise of Evidence-Based Policymaking

This is the final report of the Committee on Evidence-Based Policymaking, reported on earlier.

The Promise of Evidence-Based Policymaking
The final report, required by the Evidence-Based Policymaking Commission Act of 2016 (P.L. 114-140), was unanimously agreed to by the Members of the Commission.

Biographies for members of the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking

Answers to questions about the purpose and activities of the Commission on Evidence-Based Policymaking.

News: Certificate of Confidentiality

Rebecca Clark sent out some news via Twitter today:

Tweet


Here’s the official notice from NIH:

NOT-OD-17-109: Notice of Changes to NIH Policy for Issuing Certificates of Confidentiality

Stanford Open Policing Project

This is a collection of vehicle and pedestrian stops from law enforcement departments across the US. Currently the data consist of 130 million records from 31 state police agencies. Next stop is law enforcement agencies in major cities.

Data availability grid

The website is quite extensive. It provides access to the raw data as well as a standardized version – to enable cross-state comparisons. There is also excellent guides on how to use the data. Follow their suggestion and start with a small state. There are lots of publications based on these data – many of them covered in the popular press.

Stanford Open Policing Project

  • Data ReadMe
  • Standardized Stop Data
  • Analysis Code and Further Documentation [hosted on GitHub]
  • Publications
  • Popular Press