Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

More News

Highlights

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Intergenerational Contact and Support in Taiwan: A Comparison of Elderly Parents and Children's Reports

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionRoan, Carol L., Albert Hermalin, and Mary Beth Ofstedal. "Intergenerational Contact and Support in Taiwan: A Comparison of Elderly Parents and Children's Reports." Elderly in Asia Report No. 96-36. 8 1996.

Little is known about the degree to which information obtained from parents and children correspond on measures of contact and support, particularly in developing and newly industrialized countries. Disagreement between parents and children may be due to substantive differences in interpretations of what constitutes support or contact, or disagreement may stem from differences in measures of support and contact. Using a multigenerational data set from Taiwan, this research directly compares parents' reports to their children's reports on financial support to parents, exchange of help in household chores, and frequency of visits. We find that the level of agreement between parents and their children was quite high, upwards of 65 percent for each type of transfer. Where responses were not in agreement, they tended to follow the pattern of children "over-reporting" the event relative to their parents. Although measurement issues explain some discrepancies between parents' and children's reports, differences in perceptions of parents and children (or providers and recipients), are also behind the differences.

Dataset(s): Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly: Taiwan, 1993 (Parent and Child Samples).

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next