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Intergenerational Contact and Support in Taiwan: A Comparison of Elderly Parents and Children's Reports

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionRoan, Carol L., Albert Hermalin, and Mary Beth Ofstedal. "Intergenerational Contact and Support in Taiwan: A Comparison of Elderly Parents and Children's Reports." Elderly in Asia Report No. 96-36. 8 1996.

Little is known about the degree to which information obtained from parents and children correspond on measures of contact and support, particularly in developing and newly industrialized countries. Disagreement between parents and children may be due to substantive differences in interpretations of what constitutes support or contact, or disagreement may stem from differences in measures of support and contact. Using a multigenerational data set from Taiwan, this research directly compares parents' reports to their children's reports on financial support to parents, exchange of help in household chores, and frequency of visits. We find that the level of agreement between parents and their children was quite high, upwards of 65 percent for each type of transfer. Where responses were not in agreement, they tended to follow the pattern of children "over-reporting" the event relative to their parents. Although measurement issues explain some discrepancies between parents' and children's reports, differences in perceptions of parents and children (or providers and recipients), are also behind the differences.

Dataset(s): Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly: Taiwan, 1993 (Parent and Child Samples).

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