Nondrinker Mortality Risk In The United States

Publication Abstract

Rogers, R.G., P.M. Krueger, Richard A. Miech, E.M. Lawrence, and R. Kemp. 2013. "Nondrinker Mortality Risk In The United States." Population Research and Policy Review, 32(3): 325-352.

The literature has shown that people who do not drink alcohol are at greater risk for death than light to moderate drinkers, yet the reasons for this remain largely unexplained. We examine whether variation in people's reasons for nondrinking explains the increased mortality. Our data come from the 1988-2006 National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality File (N= 41,076 individuals age 21 and above, of whom 10,421 died over the follow-up period). The results indicate that nondrinkers include several different groups that have unique mortality risks. Among abstainers and light drinkers the risk of mortality is the same as light drinkers for a subgroup who report that they do not drink because of their family upbringing, and moral/religious reasons. In contrast, the risk of mortality is higher than light drinkers for former drinkers who cite health problems or who report problematic drinking behaviors. Our findings address a notable gap in the literature and may inform social policies to reduce or prevent alcohol abuse, increase health, and lengthen life.

10.1007/s11113-013-9268-7

ISBN: 0167-5923 (Print) 0167-5923

PMCID: PMC4100719. (Pub Med Central)

Keywords:
Nhis, abstainers, alcohol, infrequent drinkers, mortality, nondrinkers, survival

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