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Lois M. Verbrugge photo

Aging with Disability for Midlife and Older Adults

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionVerbrugge, Lois M., Kenzie Latham, and Philippa J. Clarke. 2017. "Aging with Disability for Midlife and Older Adults." PSC Research Report No. 17-876. 1 2017.

This analysis brings "aging with disability" into middle and older ages. We study U.S. adults ages 51+ and ages 65+ with persistent disability (physical, household management, personal care; PLIM, IADL, ADL), using Health and Retirement Study data. Two complementary approaches are used to identify persons with persistent disability, one based directly on observed data, the other on latent classes. Both approaches show that persistent disability is more common for persons ages 65+ than ages 51+, and more common for physical limitations than IADLs and ADLs. People with persistent disability have social and health disadvantages compared to people with other longitudinal experiences. The analysis integrates two research avenues, aging with disability and disability trajectories. It gives empirical heft to government efforts to make aging with disability an age-free (all ages) rather than age-targeted (children and youths) perspective.

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