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Lifetime Migration in the United States as of 2006-2010: Measures, Patterns, and Applications

Publication Abstract

Hermalin, Albert, and Lisa Neidert. 2017. "Lifetime Migration in the United States as of 2006-2010: Measures, Patterns, and Applications." In The Frontiers of Applied Demography edited by Swanson, David A.. Cham: Springer International Publishing.

Though most US migration analyses in recent years have relied upon 1-year and 5-year residence information, analyses of lifetime migration may be more revealing of state-level trends in the relative ability to retain the native born and to attract in-migrants from other states and abroad, and of the effect of such exchanges on the composition of its population in terms of education and other characteristics. This chapter reviews a number of measures of native retention and migrant attraction, and examines the formal relationships among these measures; presents some state-specific lifetime migration measures as of 2006-2010, with special attention to education and the impact of immigration; analyzes the degree of change in these lifetime measures centering on 1990; and uses these measures to decompose a state's proportion of college graduates into elements that highlight the relative importance of retention and attraction and illustrates how these can contribute to appropriate policy formulation.

DOI:10.1007/978-3-319-43329-5_13 (Full Text)

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