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Neighborhood conditions, religious coping, and uncontrolled hypertension

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal, G. Ironson, K. Pargament, and P. Hill. 2017. "Neighborhood conditions, religious coping, and uncontrolled hypertension." Social Science Research, 62: 161-174.

The purpose of this study is to see whether God-mediated control beliefs moderate the relationship between living in rundown neighborhoods and uncontrolled hypertension. God-mediated control refers to the belief that God will help people handle the stressors that arise in life. Data are provided by a nationwide survey of adults (N = 1919). Three ways of assessing uncontrolled hypertension are examined: a binary format contrasting people with and without uncontrolled hypertension, systolic and diastolic blood pressure scored continuously, and a four ordinal category scheme recommended by the American Heart Association. The data suggest that stronger God-mediated control beliefs moderate the relationship between neighborhood conditions and uncontrolled blood pressure when blood pressure is scored continuously and when the American Heart Association scheme are used as outcomes. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

DOI:10.1016/j.ssresearch.2016.08.004 (Full Text)

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