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Does a Religious Transformation Buffer the Effects of Lifetime Trauma on Happiness?

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal, Kenneth I. Pargament, and Gail Ironson. 2017. "Does a Religious Transformation Buffer the Effects of Lifetime Trauma on Happiness?" The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 27(2): 104-115.

AbstractA number of studies have examined religious transformations. But most of this work has been concerned with identifying different types of transformations and steps in the process of transformation. The current study was designed to examine the ways in which religious transformations may be associated with happiness. We take a novel approach toward the evaluation of this relationship. We argue that a religious transformation may be an important resource for coping with lifetime trauma. Two major findings emerge from our nationwide survey (N = 2,851). First, the data indicate that the magnitude of the relationship between lifetime trauma and happiness is reduced significantly for people who have had a religious transformation, but not for those who have not had this type of religious experience. Second, the results reveal that the potential stress-related benefits of a religious transformation are more evident among younger adults than among middle-aged or older adults.

DOI:10.1080/10508619.2017.1300506 (Full Text)

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