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Mon, Oct 23, 2017, noon: Carol Shiue, "Social Mobility in China, 1300-1800"

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Religious Involvement, Financial Strain, and Poly-Drug Use: Exploring the Moderating Role of Meaning in Life

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal, Kenneth I. Pargament, Gail Ironson, and Peter Hill. 2017. "Religious Involvement, Financial Strain, and Poly-Drug Use: Exploring the Moderating Role of Meaning in Life." Substance Use & Misuse, 52(3): 286-293.

Background: Research indicates that greater involvement in religion is associated with lower rates of substance use and misuse. However, religion is a complex construct that can be assessed in many ways. The purpose of this study is to explore a dimension of religion that has not been evaluated in previous research on poly-drug use: a religious sense of meaning in life. Objectives: It is hypothesized that a religious sense of meaning in life will offset (i.e., moderate) the effects of chronic financial strain on poly-drug use. In order to instill greater confidence in the findings, the moderating role of a religious sense of meaning in life is compared and contrasted with a general sense of meaning in life. Methods: The data are provided by a recent nationwide survey of adults of all ages in the United States (N = 2,622). The relationships among the core study constructs are evaluated with ordinary least squares multiple regression. Results: The results indicate that a greater religious sense of meaning in life buffers the effects of financial strain on poly-drug use. In contrast, a general sense of meaning in life does not appear to perform a similar stress-buffering function. Conclusions/Importance: The findings from this study are important because they provide greater insight into the potentially important ways in which involvement in religion may be associated with poly-drug use.

DOI:10.1080/10826084.2016.1225096 (Full Text)

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