Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Social Science One making available data that "may rival the total amount that currently exists in the social sciences"

Stafford's findings on gender gap in children's allowances suggest entrenched nature wage gap

Sastry et al. find parents with childhood trauma more likely to have children with behavioral health problems

More News

Highlights

Student volunteers needed for IAPHS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, Oct 3-5. Register July 23.

West et al. examine HS seniors' nonmedical use of prescription stimulants to boost study

Seefeldt promoted to associate professor of social work, associate professor of public policy

Martha Bailey elected to the Board of Officers of the Society of Labor Economists

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

More PSC brown bags, Fall 2018

Sanyu Mojola photo

Fishing in dangerous waters: Ecology, gender and economy in HIV risk

Publication Abstract

Mojola, Sanyu. 2011. "Fishing in dangerous waters: Ecology, gender and economy in HIV risk." Social Science and Medicine, 72(2): 149-156.

This paper focuses on a neglected factor in literature on the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa: the role of the eco-social environment in shaping HIV risk. I argue that the changing ecological environment of Lake Victoria, Africa's largest freshwater lake, mapping onto a gendered economy, shaped fisherfolk's sexual relationships and sexual mixing patterns in ways that were consequential for their HIV risk. Specifically, I show how disrupted lake and fish ecology had an impact on fishermen's sexual, domestic and economic partnerships, as well as how it contributed to the "sex for fish" economy in Nyanza Province, Kenya. I also show the consequences of fishermen's relative wealth on transactional relationships with school girls and women in lakeside communities. The paper is based on ethnographic fieldwork over a seven month period among the Luo ethnic group, which has the highest HIV rates in Kenya. The study included 74 individual and focus group interviews in communities around Lake Victoria, as well as 20 key informant interviews. Additionally, literature reviews on fishing and sexual economies as well as on ecological research in Lake Victoria are employed. Exploring linkages between these literatures and fieldwork findings forms the basis of this paper. I argue that solely focusing on individual level HIV prevention strategies is limited without taking into account the eco-social context of individual sexual decision making.

DOI:10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.11.006 (Full Text)

Public Access Link

Country of focus: Sub-Saharan Africa.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next