Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Adhvaryu on how promoting worker welfare contributes to profitability in India's garment industry

Murphy says suburban communities that declined in the 1960s fared better than those declining since the Great Recession

Levy et al find state budget gains outweigh Medicaid expansion costs in Michigan

More News


Live coverage of former Census director on crucial issues surrounding Census 2020. TODAY 2 pm.

PDHP invites applications for Faculty Small Grants in support of population science

ISR seeking applicants for new Community Guides program

PRB policy communication training for pre-docs extends application deadline to March 12

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, April 2, 2018, noon: Sean Reardon on Educational Inequality

Paula Fomby photo

Ecological Instability and Children's Classroom Behavior in Kindergarten

Publication Abstract

Fomby, Paula, and S. Mollborn. 2017. "Ecological Instability and Children's Classroom Behavior in Kindergarten." Demography, 54(5): 1627-1651.

We engage the concept of ecological instability to assess whether children's exposure to frequent change in multiple contexts is associated with teacher reports of students' overall behavior, externalizing behavior, and approach to learning during kindergarten. We operationalize multiple dimensions of children's exposure to repeated change-including the frequency, concurrency, chronicity, timing, and types of changes children experience-in a nationally representative longitudinal cohort of U.S.-born children (Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort, N ~ 4,750). We focus on early childhood, a period of substantial flux in children's family and neighborhood contexts. Predicted behavior scores differ by approximately one-fifth of a standard deviation for children who experienced high or chronic exposure to ecological change compared with those who experienced little or no change. These findings emphasize the distinctiveness of multidomain ecological instability as a risk factor for healthy development that should be conceptualized differently from the broader concept of normative levels of change in early childhood environments.

DOI:10.1007/s13524-017-0602-2 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs