Volunteer Work, Religious Commitment, and Resting Pulse Rates

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Krause, Neal, Gail Ironson, and Peter C. Hill. 2017. "Volunteer Work, Religious Commitment, and Resting Pulse Rates." Journal of Religion & Health, 56(2): 591-603.

Research indicates that greater involvement in volunteer activities is associated with better health. We aim to contribute to this literature in two ways. First, rather than rely on self-reports of health, measured resting pulse rates serve as the dependent variable. Second, an effort is made to see if religious commitment moderates the relationship between volunteering and resting pulse rates. Data that come from a recent nationwide survey (N = 2265) suggest that volunteer work is associated with lower resting pulse rates. The results also reveal that the relationship between engaging in volunteer work and resting pulse rates improves among study participants who are more deeply committed to religion.

DOI:10.1007/s10943-016-0347-z (Full Text)

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