Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Frey on resurgence of the suburbs

Work by Geronimus cited in PBS's '5 important stories'

Schoeni and Freedman summarize the good and bad news on dementia trends among older Americans

More News

Highlights

U-M participants at 2018 PAA Annual Meeting

PDHP invites applications for Faculty Small Grants in support of population science

Needham, Hicken, Mitchell and colleagues link maternal social disadvantage and newborn telomere length

PSC launches new program to support population scientists across U-M

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, May 7, 2018, noon: Student Forum on Educational Inequality

Neal Krause photo

Is Involvement in Religion Associated with Better Sleep Quality?

Publication Abstract

Krause, Neal, and Gail Ironson. 2017. "Is Involvement in Religion Associated with Better Sleep Quality?" Pastoral Psychology, 66(5): 595-608.

Findings from a considerable number of studies suggest that a wide range of psychosocial factors are associated with sleep quality. However, it is surprising to find that very few studies assess the relationship between religion and sleep quality. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between three key measures of religion and sleep quality. The data are from a recent nationwide survey of adults of all ages (N = 1774). A conceptual model that contains the following core relationships was evaluated empirically: (1) people who go to church more frequently tend to receive more spiritual support from fellow church members (spiritual support is assistance that is provided with the explicit purpose of bolster the religious behaviors and beliefs of the recipient), (2) more spiritual support is associated with stronger God-mediated control beliefs (God-mediated control refers to the extent to which people believe God works with them to overcome challenges that arise in life), (3) people with a strong sense of God-mediated control will feel more hopeful about the future, and (4) individuals who are more hopeful will enjoy better quality sleep. Empirical support was found for each of these relationships.

DOI:10.1007/s11089-017-0766-0 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs