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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Causes and Consequences of Schooling Outcomes in South Africa: Evidence from Survey Data

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionAnderson, Kermyt G., Anne Case, and David Lam. "Causes and Consequences of Schooling Outcomes in South Africa: Evidence from Survey Data." PSC Research Report No. 01-490. 10 2001.

This paper provides an overview of evidence on education in South Africa provided by household survey data, with a particular focus on large national surveys such as the 1993 South African Living Standards Survey and the annual October Household Survey. These surveys indicate that racial gaps in schooling persist in South Africa, although they have declined steadily over time. There is essentially no gender gap in schooling, however, with almost identical schooling outcomes for men and women in all racial groups. The racial gap in schooling can be largely attributed to a high rate of grade repetition for Africans, with only small differences in enrollment rates across racial groups. School quality has an important effect on both grade attainment and adult economic outcomes, and is clearly an important component of the racial gap in schooling. Survey data clearly demonstrate a large effect of schooling on earnings beginning in late primary years, with a higher rate of return to schooling for Africans than for whites.

Dataset(s): October Household Survey (OHS): South Africa, 1995

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