Credit where it's due: rethinking financial citizenship

Credit where it's due: rethinking financial citizenship

Publication Abstract

Wherry, Frederick F., Kristin Seefeldt, Anthony S. Alvarez, and Jose Quinonez. 2019. Credit where it's due: rethinking financial citizenship. Russell Sage Foundation.

An estimated 45 million adults in the U.S. lack a credit score at time when credit invisibility can reduce one's ability to rent a home, find employment, or secure a mortgage or loan. As a result, individuals without credit-who are disproportionately African American and Latino-often lead separate and unequal financial lives. Yet, as sociologists and public policy experts Frederick Wherry, Kristin Seefeldt, and Anthony Alvarez argue, many people who are not recognized within the financial system engage in behaviors that indicate their credit worthiness. How might institutions acknowledge these practices and help these people emerge from the financial shadows? In Credit Where It's Due, the authors evaluate an innovative model of credit-building and advocate for a new understanding of financial citizenship, or participation in a financial system that fosters social belonging, dignity, and respect.

ISBN: 978-0-87154-866-5

https://www.russellsage.org/publications/credit-where-it%E2%80%99s-due

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