America's Electoral Future: How Changing Demographics Could Impact Presidential Elections from 2016 to 2032

America's Electoral Future: How Changing Demographics Could Impact Presidential Elections from 2016 to 2032

Publication Abstract

Frey, William H., Ruy Teixeira, and Robert Griffin. 2016. America's Electoral Future: How Changing Demographics Could Impact Presidential Elections from 2016 to 2032. American Enterprise Institute.

This report explores how these demographic changes could shape the electorate, as well as potential outcomes in the next five presidential elections using national and state demographic projections produced by the States of Change project. In a 2015 report and interactive, this project presented a time series of long-term projections of race and age profiles for the populations and eligible electorates of all 50 states to 2060. This report focuses on what those projections imply for the presidential elections of 2016, 2020, 2024, 2028, and 2032.

Of course, shaping these outcomes is not the same as determining them. While the force of demography is important, election results also depend on economic conditions, candidates, and the extent to which those candidates are able to generate enthusiasm that can be measured in voter turnout and candidate preference. The analyses presented here build alternative scenarios for the election years mentioned above. Each scenario assumes the same projected demography of eligible voters, or EVs, for that year but makes different assumptions about voter turnout and candidate preference.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/americas-electoral-future/id1122865397?mt=11

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