Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Buchmueller says employee wages are hit harder than corporate profits by rising health insurance costs

Davis-Kean et al. link children's self-perceptions to their math and reading achievement

Yang and Mahajan examine how hurricanes impact migration to the US

More News

Highlights

Pamela Smock elected to PAA Committee on Publications

Viewing the eclipse from ISR-Thompson

Paula Fomby to succeed Jennifer Barber as Associate Director of PSC

PSC community celebrates Violet Elder's retirement from PSC

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Sept 11, 2017, noon:
Welcoming of Postdoctoral Fellows: Angela Bruns, Karra Greenberg, Sarah Seelye and Emily Treleaven

Sarah Burgard photo

Does Race Matter? Children's Height in Brazil and South Africa

Publication Abstract

Burgard, Sarah. 2002. "Does Race Matter? Children's Height in Brazil and South Africa." Demography, 39(4): 763-790.

This paper examines racial differences in child stunting in mid-1990s South Africa and Brazil, two multiracial societies with different histories of legal support for racial discrimination. Using data from nationally representative household samples linked to community-level measures, the analysis shows that racial inequality in the distribution of socioeconomic resources across households and communities explains much of the racial difference in stunting in both countries. Even after these factors are controlled, however, the results indicate that in South Africa, nonwhite children are still at greater risk of growth faltering than are white children. The nature of socioeconomic and racial differences in children's growth is examined, and major determinants are discussed. These findings suggest that although state-sanctioned racism may help to explain the greater racial inequality in stunting in South Africa than in Brazil, the eradication of a disadvantage for nonwhites will depend on changes in the same fundamental socioeconomic inequalities that characterize both nations.

Licensed Access Link

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next