Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Stephenson et al find "alarmingly high rates" of intimate partner violence among male couples

Social Science One making available data that "may rival the total amount that currently exists in the social sciences"

Stafford's findings on gender gap in children's allowances suggest entrenched nature of wage gap

More News

Highlights

Student volunteers needed for IAPHS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, Oct 3-5. Register July 23.

West et al. examine HS seniors' nonmedical use of prescription stimulants to boost study

Seefeldt promoted to associate professor of social work, associate professor of public policy

Martha Bailey elected to the Board of Officers of the Society of Labor Economists

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

More PSC brown bags, Fall 2018

Dirgha J. Ghimire photo

Social change, premarital nonfamily experience, and spouse choice in an arranged marriage society

Publication Abstract

Ghimire, Dirgha J., William G. Axinn, Scott T. Yabiku, and Arland Thornton. 2006. "Social change, premarital nonfamily experience, and spouse choice in an arranged marriage society." American Journal of Sociology, 111(4): 1181-1218.

This article examines the influences of nonfamily experiences on participation in the selection of a first spouse in an arranged marriage society. The authors developed a theoretical framework to explain how a broad array of nonfamily experiences may translate into greater participation in the choice of a spouse. Analyses show that premarital nonfamily experiences, in general, and media exposure and participation in youth clubs, in particular, have strong positive effects on individual participation in the choice of a spouse. These findings suggest new ways of thinking about the relationship between social change and the transition away from arranged marriage. Overall, changes in these nonfamily experiences can account for a substantial fraction of the historical increase of youth involvement in mate selection.

DOI:10.1086/498468 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next