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Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

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Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

William H. Frey photo

Brain Gains/Brain Drains

Publication Abstract

Frey, William H. 2004. "Brain Gains/Brain Drains." American Demographics, 26(5): 19-23.

Nearly a quarter of American adults have a college education - a record high. As education remains a strong priority for parents and their children, it's also a number 1 goal for governors and mayors who see attracting the best and the brightest to their states and cities as essential to enriching their tax bases and staying competitive. Fact is, competition among places for smart migrants - recent college grads, midcareer workers or retirees - creates winners and losers. Recently released migration data from the 2000 census show some surprises. Some of the most cosmopolitan, gray matter-rich sections of the country appear to be losing their grip. Elite coastal states still have the edge as bastions of the educated. Noticeably absent from this elite list are most of the states in the interior West and South. Atlanta drew the largest number of college graduates of all 48 major metropolitan areas in the country.

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