Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

Pfeffer comments on Fed report that reveals 20-year decline in net worth among American families

More News

Highlights

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

ASA President Bonilla-Silva takes exception with Chief Justice Roberts' 'gobbledygook' jab

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

The Relationship of Body Mass and Net Worth for Retirement- aged Men and Women

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Fonda, S.J., N.A. Fultz, Kristi R. Jenkins, L. Wheeler, and L.A. Wray. 2004. "The Relationship of Body Mass and Net Worth for Retirement- aged Men and Women." Research on Aging, 26(1): 153-176.

This article examines linkages between body weight and socioeconomic status (SES) among Americans at or near retirement age. The authors hypothesize that (a) body weight relates negatively to SES, (b) this relationship is greater for women than men, and (c) the relationship attenuates when health, employment, and marital status are controlled. We use the 1992 Health and Retirement Study for this examination. SES is measured as net worth. Body weight is measured as body mass index and categorized as normal weight, overweight, and obese. Results indicate that, for women, overweight and obesity relate to lower logged networth. This relationship attenuates once covariates are considered. For men, overweight and obesity relate to higher logged net worth, even when covariates are considered. The findings suggest that greater weight has different meanings for men and women in this cohort; it might be related to success for men but a sociocultural detriment for women.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next