Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Work by Geronimus cited in account of Serena Williams' maternal health complications

Alexander and Massey compare outcomes for children whose parents did and did not take part in Great Migration

Geronimus on pushing past early dismissal of her weathering hypothesis

More News

Highlights

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation health leadership development programs accepting applications

AA named 2018 Best Place to Live in America (out of 100 cities)

Remembering Jim Morgan, founding member of ISR and creator of the PSID

1/17/18: ISR screening and discussion of documentary "Class Divide" at Michigan Theater

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Depressive symptoms and mortality risk in a national sample: Confounding effects of health status

Publication Abstract

Everson-Rose, S.A., James S. House, and R.P. Mero. 2004. "Depressive symptoms and mortality risk in a national sample: Confounding effects of health status." Psychosomatic Medicine, 66(6): 823-830.

Objective: We examined the association between depressive symptoms and all-cause mortality in a population sample. Published findings on the relation between depressive symptoms and mortality risk point to an inconsistent association and one that is likely influenced by health status. Few studies have assessed this relation in randomly selected population samples. Methods: Participants were 3617 non institutionalized adults, age 25 years or older, from the Americans' Changing Lives Study, an ongoing longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample. Depressive symptoms were measured by the 11-item version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Cox proportional hazards models estimated the relative risk of mortality as a function of the CES-D scores at baseline. Results: In 7.5 years of follow-up, 542 deaths occurred. Each 1-standard unit increase on the CES-D predicted a 21% increased risk of all-cause mortality, adjusting for age, gender, and race (hazard ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.08 to 1.36, p = .001). This association was weakened somewhat following adjustment for education, income, body mass index, smoking and alcohol consumption (hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval = 0.99 to 1.28, p = .06). However, control for self-reported functional limitations or chronic health conditions at baseline effectively eliminated the relationship. Analyses limited to participants with good to excellent health or no functional impairments at baseline showed no association between depressive symptoms and subsequent mortality risk. Secondary analyses showed no association between depressive symptoms and cardiovascular mortality. Conclusions: These findings from a randomly selected, nationally representative sample do not support the hypothesis that depressive symptoms are independently related to mortality in the general population, after adequate adjustment for the confounding effects of physical health status.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next