Changes in Fertility Expectations and Preferences between 1962-1977: Their Relation to Final Parity

Publication Abstract

Freedman, Ronald, D. Freedman, and Arland Thornton. 1980. "Changes in Fertility Expectations and Preferences between 1962-1977: Their Relation to Final Parity." Demography, 17(4): 365-78.

Unlike most other causes of death, homicide has been increasing in the United States, especially since the mid-1960s. Its impact is greatest among nonwhite men. The elimination of homicide would add approximately one and one-half years to their life span. This analysis examines trends and differentials using vital statistics data about homicide victims. A decomposition of components of change reveals that almost all of the rise in homicide mortality among nonwhites and a substantial fraction of the rise among whites results from the increasing use of firearms to kill people.

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