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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Immigration Status and Health Insurance Coverage: Who Gains? Who Loses?

Publication Abstract

Prentice, J.C., A.R. Pebley, and Narayan Sastry. 2005. "Immigration Status and Health Insurance Coverage: Who Gains? Who Loses?" American Journal of Public Health, 95(1)109-116.

Objectives. We compared health insurance status transitions of nonimmigrants and immigrants.

Methods. We used multivariate survival analysis to examine gaining and losing insurance by citizenship and legal status among adults with the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey.

Results. We found significant differences by citizenship and legal status in health insurance transitions. Undocumented immigrants were less likely to gain and more likely to lose insurance compared with native-born citizens. Legal residents were less likely to gain and were slightly more likely to lose insurance compared with native-born citizens. Naturalized citizens did not differ from native-born citizens.

Conclusions. Previous studies have not examined health insurance transitions by citizenship and legal status. Policies to increase coverage should consider the experiences of different immigrant groups.

DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2003.028514. (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC1449861. (Pub Med Central)

Country of focus: United States of America.

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