Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Work by Geronimus cited in account of Serena Williams' maternal health complications

Alexander and Massey compare outcomes for children whose parents did and did not take part in Great Migration

Geronimus on pushing past early dismissal of her weathering hypothesis

More News

Highlights

AA named 2018 Best Place to Live in America (out of 100 cities)

Remembering Jim Morgan, founding member of ISR and creator of the PSID

1/17/18: ISR screening and discussion of documentary "Class Divide" at Michigan Theater

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Predicting Risky Drinking Outcomes Longitudinally: What Kind of Advance Notice Can We Get?

Publication Abstract

Zucker, R.A., M.M. Wong, D.B. Clark, K.E. Leonard, John E. Schulenberg, J.R. Cornelius, H.E. Fitzgerald, G.G. Homish, A. Merline, J.T. Nigg, Patrick M. O'Malley, and L.I. Puttler. 2006. "Predicting Risky Drinking Outcomes Longitudinally: What Kind of Advance Notice Can We Get?" Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 30(20): 243-252.

This paper summarizes the proceedings ora symposium presented at the 2005 Research Society on Alcoholism meeting in Santa Barbara, California, that spans the interval from toddlerhood to early middle adulthood and addresses questions about how Far ahead developmentally we can anticipate alcohol problems and related substance use disorder and how such work informs our understanding of the Causes and course of alcohol problems and alcohol use disorder. The context of these questions both historically and developmentally is set by Robert Zucker in an introductory section. Next, Maria Wong and colleagues describe the developmental trajectories of behavioral and affective control front preschool to early adolescence in a high risk for alcoholism longitudinal study and demonstrate their ability to predict alcohol drug outcomes in adolescence. Duncan Clark and Jack Cornelius follow with a report on the predicitive utility of parental disruptive behavior disorders in predicting onset of alcohol problems in their adolescent offspring in late adolescence. Next, Kenneth Leonard and Gregory Homish report on adult development study findings relating baseline individual, spouse, and peer network drinking indicators at marriage onset that distinguish different patterns of stability and change in alcohol problems over the first 2 years of marriage. In the final paper, John Schulenberg and colleagues, utilizing national panel data from the Monitoring the Future Study, which cover the 18- to 35-year age span, show how trajectories of alcohol use in early adulthood predict differential alcohol abuse and dependence Outcomes at age 35. Finally, Robert Zucker examines the degree to which the Core symposium questions are answered and comments on next step research and clinical practice changes that are called for by these findings.

DOI:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00033.x (Full Text)

PMCID: PMC1761127. (Pub Med Central)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next