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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Determinants of influenza vaccination in hard-to-reach urban populations

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Bryant, W.K., D.C. Ompad, S. Sisco, S. Blaney, K. Glidden, E. Phillips, D. Vlahov, and Sandro Galea. 2006. "Determinants of influenza vaccination in hard-to-reach urban populations." Preventive Medicine, 43(1), 60-70.

Objective. Influenza vaccination rates among disadvantaged minority and hard-to-reach populations are lower than in other groups. We assessed the barriers to influenza vaccination in disadvantaged urban areas.

Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional study, using venue-based sampling, collecting data on residents of eight neighborhoods throughout East Harlem and the Bronx, New York City.

Results. Of 760 total respondents, 461 (61.6%) had received influenza vaccination at some point in their life. In multivariable models, having access to routine medical care, receipt of health or social services, having tested positive for HfV, and current interest in receiving influenza vaccination were significantly associated with having received influenza vaccination in the previous year. Of participants surveyed, 79.6% were interested in receiving an influenza vaccination at the time of survey. Among participants who had never previously received influenza vaccination in the past, 73.4% were interested in being vaccinated; factors significantly associated with an interest in being vaccinated were minority race, lower annual income, history of being homeless, being uninsured/underinsured, and not having access to routine medical care.

Conclusions. Participants who are unconnected to health or social services or government health insurance are less likely to have been vaccinated in the past although these persons are willing to receive vaccine if it were available.

DOI:10.1016/j.ypmed.2006.03.018 (Full Text)

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