Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Buchmueller says employee wages are hit harder than corporate profits by rising health insurance costs

Davis-Kean et al. link children's self-perceptions to their math and reading achievement

Yang and Mahajan examine how hurricanes impact migration to the US

More News

Highlights

Pamela Smock elected to PAA Committee on Publications

Viewing the eclipse from ISR-Thompson

Paula Fomby to succeed Jennifer Barber as Associate Director of PSC

PSC community celebrates Violet Elder's retirement from PSC

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Sept 11, 2017, noon:
Welcoming of Postdoctoral Fellows: Angela Bruns, Karra Greenberg, Sarah Seelye and Emily Treleaven

Use and non-use of clarification features in web surveys

Publication Abstract

Conrad, Frederick G., Mick P. Couper, Roger Tourangeau, and Andrey Peytchev. 2006. "Use and non-use of clarification features in web surveys." Journal of Official Statistics, 22(2): 245-269.

Survey respondents misunderstand questions often enough to compromise the quality of their answers. Web surveys promise to improve understanding by making definitions available to respondents when they need clarification. We explore web survey respondents’ use of clarification features in two experiments. The first experiment demonstrates that respondents rarely request definitions but are more likely to do so when they realize definitions could be helpful (i.e., definitions are available for technical terms) and when requests involve relatively little effort (i.e., just one click); respondents who obtained a definition requested more subsequent definitions when the initial one proved useful (i.e., included counter-intuitive of surprising information). In the second experiment, definitions available via mouse roll-over were requested substantially more often than when available via clicking, suggesting that some respondents find even a click more effort than they are willing to expend. We conclude with a discussion of interactive features in web surveys in general, when they are likely to be used and when they are likely to be useful.

Public Access Link

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next