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Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Socioeconomic differentials in mortality among the oldest old in China

Publication Abstract

Zhu, Haiyan, and Yu Xie. 2007. "Socioeconomic differentials in mortality among the oldest old in China." Research on Aging, 29(2): 125-143.

Although an inverse relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and mortality has been well documented for many populations throughout the world, it remains unclear whether this relationship holds true for the oldest old. Most notably, some scholars have suggested that the relationship may disappear at the oldest ages. Using data from the 1998, 2000, and 2002 waves of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey, this study examined the relationship between SES and mortality among the oldest old (80 years and older) population in China. The results show the continuing prevalence of SES differentials in mortality-higher SES is significantly associated with lower mortality risks-among the oldest old in China. The authors further show that the relationship holds regardless of how the oldest old are operationalized (as 80 years and older, 90 years and older, or 100 years and older).

DOI:10.1177/0164027506296758 (Full Text)

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