Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

More News

Highlights

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

What can be learned about peer effects using college roommates? Evidence from new survey data and students from disadvantaged backgrounds

Publication Abstract

Stinebrickner, R., and Todd R. Stinebrickner. 2006. "What can be learned about peer effects using college roommates? Evidence from new survey data and students from disadvantaged backgrounds." Journal of Public Economics, 90(8-9): 1435-1454.

Previous papers which examine the importance of peer effects using exogenous variation in college roommates have found only very limited evidence that a student's first year grade performance is influenced by the observable academic characteristics of his/her roommate. One possible explanation for this finding is that peer effects do not play a particularly important role in the higher education setting. However, another very plausible explanation for this finding is that peer effects are important in higher education but that these previous empirical efforts have simply not been "looking in the right place" to find the evidence of peer effects in this setting. Thus, while these papers have received considerable attention due to the general difficulty of finding credible exogenous variation in peer quality, they have difficulty answering the most fundamental question related to peer effects in this higher education-whether peer effects play an important role or not. This paper provides depth to the peer effects literature using unique new survey and administrative data.

DOI:10.1016/j.jpubeco.2006.03.002 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next