Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Davis-Kean et al. link children's self-perceptions to their math and reading achievement

Yang and Mahajan examine how hurricanes impact migration to the US

Patrick and colleagues analyze high-intensity drinking among adolescents

More News

Highlights

Pamela Smock elected to PAA Committee on Publications

Viewing the eclipse from ISR-Thompson

Paula Fomby to succeed Jennifer Barber as Associate Director of PSC

PSC community celebrates Violet Elder's retirement from PSC

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Sept 11, 2017, noon:
Welcoming of Postdoctoral Fellows: Angela Bruns, Karra Greenberg, Sarah Seelye and Emily Treleaven

Redevelopment and the Rustbelt: Race, Class and the Consideration of Redeveloped Neighborhoods

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Download PDF versionBader, Michael. 2008. "Redevelopment and the Rustbelt: Race, Class and the Consideration of Redeveloped Neighborhoods." PSC Research Report No. 08-651. 7 2008.

This study investigates who would consider moving to a redeveloped neighborhood based on a sample of residents living in Chicago and its surrounding suburbs. Results show different patterns depending on whether one is a homeowner or renter. Chicago owners are more likely to consider moving to a redeveloped neighborhood than suburban owners, particularly for whites and Latinos. Among renters, racial differences are more pronounced than city/suburban residence: black renters the most likely to consider a redeveloped neighborhood. Additionally, supporting theories of gentrification, I find some evidence that educational attainment predicts a willingness to consider a redeveloped neighborhood, but only among older respondents. While some argue that redevelopment could reduce the economic and racial segregation of rustbelt cities, I find this unlikely based on these results.

Country of focus: United States of America.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next