Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Miller et al. find benefits of Medicaid for pregnant mothers in 1980s carry over two generations

Starr's findings account for some of the 19% black-white gap in federal sentencing

Frey says suburbs are aging, cities draw millennials

More News

Highlights

Bailey et al. find higher income among children whose parents had access to federal family planning programs in the 1960s and 70s

U-M's campus climate survey results discussed in CHE story

U-M honors James Jackson's groundbreaking work on how race impacts the health of black Americans

U-M is the only public and non-coastal university on Forbes' top-10 list for billionaire production

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 22, 2018, noon: Narayan Sastry

Financial and social circumstances and the incidence and course of PTSD in Mississippi during the first two years after hurricane Katrina

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Galea, Sandro, M. Tracy, F. Norris, and S.F. Coffey. 2008. "Financial and social circumstances and the incidence and course of PTSD in Mississippi during the first two years after hurricane Katrina." Journal of Traumatic Stress, 21(4): 357-368.

Hurricane Katrina was the most devastating natural disaster to hit the United States in the past 75 years. The authors conducted interviews of 810 persons who were representative of adult residents living in the 23 southernmost counties of Mississippi before Hurricane Katrina. The prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) since Hurricane Katrina was 22.5%. The determinants of PTSD were female gender, experience of hurricane-related financial loss, postdisaster stressors, low social support, and postdisaster traumatic events. Kaplan-Meier survival curves suggest that exposure to both hurricane-related traumatic events and to financial and social stressors influenced the duration of PTSD symptoms. Postdisaster interventions that aim to improve manipulable stressors after these events may influence the onset and course of PTSD.

DOI:10.1002/jts.20355 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next